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Nishijima Moe (Graduate School of Science and Engineering) awarded the “Excellent Presentation Prize” for the “5th Nanosynergetics Workshop”.

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2020.12.16

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Nishijima Moe (Graduate School of Science and Engineering) awarded the “Excellent Presentation Prize” for the “5th Nanosynergetics Workshop”.

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Nishijima Moe, a first year student of the Graduate School of Science and Engineering Chemistry Course, has been awarded the “Excellent Presentation Prize” at the “5th Nanosynergetics Workshop”, which was held on November 13, 2020.

This is an international workshop where researchers on Nanosynergetics gather to share and exchange the latest research results. This year, the workshop was held online via use of Zoom. A total of 24 young researchers and students gave their presentations online, and 4 were awarded the Excellent Presentation Prize.

Nishijima’s research topic was “Singlet Biradical Character: Radical Reactivity of Bis (Imidazolyl Radicals)”. This is an experimental evaluation of singlet biradicals with two unpaired electrons. Singlet biradicals are of great interest for their unique characteristics, however it is difficult to give an experimental evaluation due to their high-reactivity and short-living characteristics.
Using the photochromic molecules that create singlet biradicals by the irradiation of ultra violet light, Nishijima was able to observe the reaction process of the singlet biradicals returning to their original form by the radical recombination reaction. Through observing the reaction process, Nishijima succeeded in estimating the singlet biradical character using experimental radical reactivity indices.
Nishijima was recognized as being worthy of the award not only for her exceptional research on new experimental evaluation methods of singlet biradicals through proactive use of photochromic molecules, but also for her outstanding presentation given in English.

*Photochromic molecules:
Photochromic molecules are molecules that reversibly change their structure, color, and nature upon exposure to light. The “Fast Switchable Photochromic Molecules” developed at the Abe research lab, can change their structure and colors at a high speed, faster than the regular photochromic molecules. Expected applications include sunglasses that can instantly change their color, and real time holograms.

Nishijima Moe, recipient of the award Nishijima Moe, recipient of the award

Nishijima Moe, recipient of the award